Introduction

Of all the experiences faced by families and individuals, the most stressful is the loss of a loved one through death. Granger E. Westberg, author of Good Grief, said that while he was working as a clergyman in a medical center, he became aware of the fact that many people were ill as a result of some unresolved grief. "There is a stronger relationship than we have ever thought between illness and the way a person handles a great loss," Westberg said.

The goal of Good Grief Groups is to create an atmosphere in hospitals, churches, funeral homes, and other organizations in which those who grieve can find healing. This is accomplished through mutual support, sharing, and understanding from other members of the group, along with the materials presented in the workbook. The workbook is described in more detail in the Workbook section. The materials are written so that the groups can be lead by ministers, parish nurses, social workers, chaplains, Stephen’s Ministers and others who have group leadership skills. Experience and training in psychology and counseling is helpful, as is specific education and experience in grief management. Training for leaders is available from the author.

We believe that as one is able to think, talk, write, and weep about their loss they will be able to move beyond grief to Good Grief.

If your organization is interested in starting your own Good Grief support group for those who are experiencing a time of loss, contact us and we'll be happy to help you.

Chaplain Cecil W. Fike



Good Grief Groups


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